Pro-government supporters of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak (L) clash with anti-government protesters in Tahrir square in central Cairo February 2, 2011. Egypt’s army denied firing any shots in Cairo’s Tahrir Square, where pro- and anti-government protesters were clashing, state television said on Wednesday. REUTERS/Yannis Behrakis (EGYPT – Tags: CIVIL UNREST POLITICS)

Pro and anti-Mubarak supporters clash at Tahrir Square in Cairo February 2, 2011. Opponents and supporters of Egypt’s President Hosni Mubarak fought with fists, stones and clubs in Cairo on Wednesday in what appeared to be a move by forces loyal to the Egyptian leader to end protests calling for him to quit. REUTERS/Goran Tomasevic (EGYPT – Tags: POLITICS CIVIL UNREST)

Pro-Mubarak protesters captured by anti-government supporters are handed over to the army during rioting between pro and anti-Mubarak supporters at Tahrir Square in Cairo February 2, 2011. Opponents and supporters of Egypt’s President Hosni Mubarak fought with fists, stones and clubs in Cairo on Wednesday in what appeared to be a move by forces loyal to the Egyptian leader to end protests calling for him to quit. REUTERS/Goran Tomasevic (EGYPT – Tags: POLITICS CIVIL UNREST)

Pro and anti-Mubarak supporters clash at Tahrir Square in Cairo February 2, 2011. Opponents and supporters of Egypt’s President Hosni Mubarak fought with fists, stones and clubs in Cairo on Wednesday in what appeared to be a move by forces loyal to the Egyptian leader to end protests calling for him to quit. REUTERS/Goran Tomasevic (EGYPT – Tags: POLITICS CIVIL UNREST)

Pro-government demonstrators, one holding a portrait of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak, take over a truck to shield themselves from thrown rocks as they clash with anti-government demonstrators, unseen, next to the Egyptian Museum in Tahrir square in Cairo, Egypt Wednesday, Feb. 2, 2011. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis)

Pro-government demonstrators, some riding camels and horses and armed with sticks, clash with anti-government demonstrators in Tahrir square, the center of anti-government demonstrations, in Cairo, Egypt Wednesday, Feb. 2, 2011. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis)

Anti-government demonstrators carry an injured man during clashes with supporters of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak at Tahrir Square in Cairo February 2, 2011. Opponents and supporters of Mubarak fought with fists, stones and clubs in Cairo on Wednesday in what appeared to be a move by forces loyal to the Egyptian leader to end protests calling for him to quit. REUTERS/Amr Abdallah Dalsh (EGYPT – Tags: CIVIL UNREST POLITICS)

CAIRO, EGYPT – FEBRUARY 02: Anti-government protestors place broken paving stones on an Egyptian flag to throw at supporters of President Mubarak in Tahrir Square on February 2, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Yesterday President Hosni Mubarak announced that he would not run for another term in office, but would stay in power until elections later this year. Thousands of supporters of Egypt’s longtime president and opponents of the regime clashed in Tahrir Square, throwing rocks and fighting with improvised weapons. (Photo by Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images)

CAIRO, EGYPT – FEBRUARY 02: Anti-government protestors place broken paving stones on an Egyptian flag to throw at supporters of President Mubarak in Tahrir Square on February 2, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Yesterday President Hosni Mubarak announced that he would not run for another term in office, but would stay in power until elections later this year. Thousands of supporters of Egypt’s longtime president and opponents of the regime clashed in Tahrir Square, throwing rocks and fighting with improvised weapons. (Photo by Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images)

Thousands of pro-government supporters of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak push their way towards Tahrir square overrunning a military checkpoint in central Cairo February 2, 2011. Egypt’s army denied firing any shots in Cairo’s Tahrir Square, where pro- and anti-government protesters were clashing, state television said on Wednesday. REUTERS/Amr Abdallah Dalsh (EGYPT – Tags: CIVIL UNREST POLITICS)